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Visual Collective


An initiative to display the work of Carnegie Mellon students around campus.

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Visual Collective


An initiative to display the work of Carnegie Mellon students around campus.

Overview

April – May 2013

Identity, systems design.

Collaborators: Zachary Bergeron, Sahana Kumar

Carnegie Mellon University has a thriving visual arts community, but the campus is not representative of the work students are creating.

Visual Collective is a proposal to create an initiative to display student created work around the Carnegie Mellon campus in order to create a greater sense of community around campus.

 

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The Problem

These are the current forms to submit an installation application on campus.

Students currently have the opportunity to display work on campus. However, the installation process is cumbersome and exclusive to the School of Fine Art, severely limiting the types of work that appear on our campus. Students must have a course and faculty sponsor in order to get their submissions approved, allowing only a small sector of the diverse student population to display their visual work on campus. There are six different forms a student has to fill out in order to have their work installed on campus. On top of this, the installation program that currently exists is poorly advertised. Essentially, the process is inaccessible to nearly all students.

 

The Goal

We hope to create a sense of ownership and community for the campus by adding student-created, visually stimulating work on campus. 


 

We would like to accomplish this goal by first raising awareness that there is an opportunity to display work around campus, and secondly, simplifying the installation submission process.

 

Raising Awareness

In order to raise awareness, we created a series of posters to hang around campus to inform students that they can display their work around campus. We also created an alternate set of posters to hang next to student installations, notifying students that their peers created the installation they are looking at.


 

The graphic shapes on the posters were influenced by the abstract shapes within the Randy Pausch bridge and Wean Hall of Engineering on Carnegie Mellon's campus. We wanted our graphic language to be deeply rooted within the CMU community.

 

Increasing Accessibility

Visual Collective aims to increase the accessibility of the art installation process by providing a website that houses all of the application materials related to the submission process. 

By placing all of the application materials on the website, we can show students what their peers are doing around campus, as well as provide a streamlined process to submit their ideas for approval by a campus administrator. This also opens the application process up to people outside the Fine Arts major.


 

Our website is comprised of a form to submit an application to create an installation, guidelines on how to install work, an archive of previous installations, and a gallery showcasing upcoming work from various students.

Landing Page

When visitors first arrive at the Visual Collective site, they will be immersed in photographs of the work CMU students are creating. This home page establishes the visual language of the rest of the site.  

Archive

Visual Collective will archive the work students install around campus by placing webcams at the five designated installation locations around campus. Installations can then easily be documented during their duration, and be cataloged within the Visual Collective site.

The archive serves as a visual history of the values of Carnegie Mellon's campus. Student work is dynamic, and reactive to the world around us. We hope to create an archive that acts as an artifact for students seeing their friends' work, as well as later generations using it to obtain an understanding of how the campus has evolved as a living system over the years.

Users can click on a thumbnail of a piece to find out the artist's description, the duration of the installation, the piece as the artist submitted it, and the piece in the context of the installation space.

Upcoming Installations

Users can preview work that will be installed in the coming weeks around campus. Images are taken from the artist's application, where they must submit a concept sketch or finalized piece in order to get their installation approved by a campus administrator.

Users can also see where the installation will be around campus, as well as the duration of the upcoming installation.

Submission Form

This standardized web form allows students to easily submit proposals for installations. Previously, students had to fill out multiple forms and track down various staff members to get approval. We felt like this was an unnecessary complication in the installation process.

We simplified the form by determining five different permanent installation locations around campus, allowing students to select a location that would be most appropriate for their work.

Students submit an image of their work for the proposal. This image is used to populate the Upcoming Installations page, as well as the Archive. 

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Serifa Type Specimen


 A type specimen of the Serifa typeface designed by Adrian Frutiger.

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Serifa Type Specimen


 A type specimen of the Serifa typeface designed by Adrian Frutiger.

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IRB Application


Redesigning the research proposal form at Carnegie Mellon.

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IRB Application


Redesigning the research proposal form at Carnegie Mellon.

The Institutional Review Board at Carnegie Mellon approves research studies that involve human participants.

I reorganized the form in a digital PDF format for increased efficiency on both the administrator's and user's interaction with the form. My goal for the design was to have a consistent grid structure and visual language, with each section having its own page for added clarity.

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Romibo


Researching social robot therapy to help children with disabilities.

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Romibo


Researching social robot therapy to help children with disabilities.

Romibo is a low cost robot designed to help children with disabilities.

 

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Duties

I recruited and interviewed parents, teachers and clinicians of children with mental and physical disabilities. I visited local schools and homes of children with disabilities, interviewing them to gain feedback on a Romibo prototype, insight on day to day life for the children, and what social behaviors could benefit our audience.

I developed a sorting exercise for participants to associate existing social therapy robots with different positive and negative adjectives in order to gauge a relationship between anthropomorphism and perceived friendliness in robots.

 

Methods

  • Contextual Inquiry
  • Interviewing
  • Developing Research Protocols
  • Association/Sorting Exercises with Participant
  • Affinity Diagramming


Feedback was used to inform us of how we could modify Romibo's behavior and appearance to better suit our audience's needs.

 

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Illustrations


Digital drawings based on a variety of found content.

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Illustrations


Digital drawings based on a variety of found content.

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About


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About



Hi, I'm Katherine.

I am a junior at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

I am double majoring in Communication Design and Human-Computer Interaction, and pursuing a minor in Fine Art.

I love art, design, interaction and 80's new wave. I am currently learning how to DJ for WRCT 88.3.

Feel free to email me!